Is it possible to limit a database search by publication date?

Is it possible to limit a database search by publication date?

The full text limit (which only returns full-text articles in your search results), the scholarly/peer reviewed limit (which only returns scholarly/peer reviewed articles in your search results), and the publication date limit are the most prevalent restrictions in a database (which allows you to specify when you would like the search results to appear).

Where to find search limiters in a database?

Many databases enable you to set limiters after you run your search if you fail to specify them before you run it. Limiters for Full Text, Peer-Reviewed Scholarly Journals, and Publication Date may be found in the EBSCO databases under Limit To in the column to the left of the results.

How to limit search results in a database?

These databases are likewise set to full text by default. Below the search fields, look for a full text tick. Journals from SAGE: Select "Only stuff I have full access to" under Access Type on the Advanced Search screen. Scroll down a little to locate it. Most library databases allow you to narrow your search results by publication date.

Many databases enable you to set limiters after you run your search if you fail to specify them before you run it. Limiters for Full Text, Peer-Reviewed Scholarly Journals, and Publication Date may be found in the EBSCO databases under Limit To in the column to the left of the results.

In the Limit your results area, the Full Text option is located below the search boxes farther down the page. ProQuest: Full text is also the default setting for these databases. Below the search fields, look for a full text tick. Journals from SAGE: Select "Only stuff I have full access to" under Access Type on the Advanced Search screen.

Can you limit searches to peer-reviewed journals?

Some databases allow you to restrict article searches to peer-reviewed publications alone. This function, for example, is available on the initial search page of Academic Search Complete; simply click on the relevant box to narrow the search. To achieve this, you may need to navigate to a "advanced" or "expert" search screen in some databases.

What is one way you can limit your search in the library’s databases?

Most library databases allow you to limit your search results to things that are only available in full text, which means that the entire article is available. For example, if you were looking for research on tropical storms in the Atlantic Ocean, a database search would return results from scientific journals, the National Center for Atmospheric Research website, and other sources. If what you're looking for is information about tropical storms in the Atlantic Ocean during certain time periods, though, then only articles from scientific journals would be relevant, because the free articles on the NCAR site contain only summaries of studies or discussions of current research.

Searching libraries' databases is different from searching the Internet with search engines like Google or Bing. When you use these tools to search the Web, the results of your search show up in response to your query instantly; there's no need to wait for a librarian to find relevant material. With database searches, by contrast, the computer has to read every single record in the database to see if it matches your search criteria. This means that the result you get back may not be accurate or complete. For example, if you searched the Web for information about tropical storms in the Atlantic Ocean last year, the results would most likely include information about Hurricane Sandy as well as other events that occurred at the same time.

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Donald Rook

Donald Rook is a software engineer who's passion is building things. He has over 10 years of experience in the industry and has been working with Rails since 2008. If he isn't working on his projects, Donald enjoys reading, going to the gym, and spending time with his wife and two sons.

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